Getting laid off or fired on a work visa can lead to deportation

Getting laid off or fired on a work visa can lead to deportation

| May 15, 2020 | Uncategorized |

Losing your job unexpectedly can easily result in financial hardship, especially when you have a spouse and children to support. Many families don’t have much set aside in savings. Even if they do, they may not have enough to cover weeks or months of living expenses. 

For families that have entered the United States because one member has an H-1B visa or similar temporary work visa, the loss of a job due to a layoff or termination, possibly due to the business closing or downsizing, can have devastating consequences. Not only do they have to worry about the financial implications of losing their temporary position, but they also have to face potentially uprooting their family because their visa is tied to their work.

Those facing potential deportation have rights

Before you panic when you receive notice of your pending layoffs or termination, it’s important to carefully review your situation — and your choices. There may be options available to you, including negotiating some kind of transitional arrangements with your employer or even seeking a new job.

Anyone in the United States on a work-related visa could find themselves at risk during a weak economy or when their employer founders. Even highly-skilled and educated workers performing important work could wind up vulnerable, as could manual and seasonal laborers who enter the United States for work. 

Anyone facing deportation or serious issues with their visa should educate themselves about their rights and make proactive decisions to protect their family. Often, such a process will include a consultation with an experienced immigration attorney about their legal options.